Actualités et séminaires

  • 15 Mar Séminaire

    Les émissions naturelles de CH4 provenant des lacs représentent une source de GES pour l’atmosphère dont l’ampleur passée, présente et future est toujours fort incertaine. Cette incertitude vient, entre autres, de la difficulté d’estimer dans quelle proportion le méthane produit sera émis directement ou d’abord oxydée en CO2.

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  • 15 Mar Séminaire

    Les émissions naturelles de CH4 provenant des lacs représentent une source de GES pour l’atmosphère dont l’ampleur passée, présente et future est toujours fort incertaine. Cette incertitude vient, entre autres, de la difficulté d’estimer dans quelle proportion le méthane produit sera émis directement ou d’abord oxydée en CO2.

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  • 14 Mar Séminaire

    The age of the groundwater is an important parameter that plays a part in estimating the sustainability of the resource. This parameter is difficult to quantify, as samples (i.e., water wells) often contain a mixture of waters of different origins and residence times. Some tracers, such as radiogenic helium, have multiple sources that cannot be quantified. Here, we present the results of a study on water dating in a region near Montreal, Quebec. Four dating methods were compared: 3H-3He, 14C, U-Th/4He, and 234U/238U.

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  • 06 Mar Séminaire

    Inland waters are major players of the global carbon cycle. Despite their modest surface area on Earth, inland waters show a high biogeochemical reactivity across the land-ocean continuum and account for annual CO2 emissions equivalent to the ocean carbon sink. While such emissions are, for instance, commonly related to an overall prevalence of organic matter mineralization over production, our current understanding of the fine spatial and temporal dynamics of carbon cycling in aquatic systems remains limited.

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  • 01 Mar Séminaire

    In the early stage of numerical model development, owing to limited computation capabilities simplified formulation were used to simulate physical processes. Hence, in the 80s and 90s, climate models are structured to simulate atmospheric and oceanic processes at the scale of the Earth system. It is only in the 2000s, that, for instance, ecosystems components have been included in the IPSL- Earth system climate model which has resulted in a continuous increase of model complexity.

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